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Heat waves force Schools from Philadelphia to Los Angeles to close early

Heat waves in Philadelphia and Los Angeles. Schools
Written by Smartandstuck

This week’s heat waves from Philadelphia to Los Angeles led schools around the country to change activities, close early, or switch to remote learning.

Because the facilities in Philadelphia lacked “adequate cooling equipment,” administrators chose to close 118 schools three hours earlier on Tuesday and Wednesday. In spite of warnings that certain buildings could exceed, the move happened on the first day of the new school year, stunning thousands of pupils. the interior is at least 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

According to Tony Watlington, the administrator of the Philadelphia school district, 57% of the schools do not have enough air conditioning to guarantee that all students and employees will be appropriately chilled. We’ll keep learning and taking tests.

Due to a heat wave and the lack of air conditioning in their buildings, nearly two dozen Baltimore schools took similar action on Monday and Tuesday. Even though the school year has only just begun, ten schools in Cleveland, Ohio, were also compelled to switch to remote learning this week.

Health officials in Los Angeles also issued a warning to locals to get ready for the year’s hottest and longest heat wave, with temperatures predicted to reach above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. In order to shield students from inclement weather, some Southern California school districts relocated school practices to the morning and postponed some activities, while others announced they would move recess indoors.

As of Wednesday, San Diego will also be under an excessive heat advisory, with temperatures likely reaching 109 degrees, according to weather officials. Earlier closures were required to protect students due to reported issues with your air conditioning systems last week.

In the United States, heat waves bring an end to an exceptionally warm summer. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports that millions of people died from suffocation during an abnormally hot July, when average nighttime temperatures reached their highest levels ever.

According to data from NASA’s Earth last month, “heat was widespread and persistent in the US as high-pressure air systems produced stagnant heat domes, placing more than 150 million people under heat advisories and warnings.” “Above-average temperatures were experienced in almost all of the US’s continental regions. Many states had triple-digit highs, some lasting for an entire day.

Scientists have long warned that as the earth warms due to the use of fossil fuels, climate change will only make heat waves worse and more frequent. Large areas of the US may frequently endure triple-digit days throughout the summer in the middle of this century, according to researchers.

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Smartandstuck

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